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Wednesday, July 18th, 2012 - Carol Graham

My next topic on muscle imbalances and corrective exercises is on humeral internal rotation.  This is pretty much a fancy way of explaining the positioning of the arms.

This simply means that your arms turn in so that your palms are facing back.  In other words, the shoulders and arms are rotating towards the center of the body.

The humerus is the big bone that makes up the upper part of your arm.  So, just break down the position: humeral internal rotation…make sense?

More after the jump….

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Tuesday, June 26th, 2012 - Shane Doll

As a certified Charleston personal trainer I often get asked what’s the best type of workout to do that will help with low back pain? It’s a good question because not all exercise routines are created equal.

In this post I’ll be sharing some tips on the best way to workout to eliminate low back pain and explain why there are some exercises you’ll want to avoid.

I’ll preface this discussion by recommending you have a reputable chiropractor examine your low back pain before starting any exercise routine. It’s imperative that you discover the underlying cause(s) of the pain before exercising in a way that may make the situation worse.

Make no mistake, certain exercises can be extremely effective in eliminating low back pain, but you you need to know what you’re dealing with. The pain may be the result of subluxation of the vertebrae caused by muscle imbalances or it may be the result of a more serious condition with a bulging disc, etc.

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Tuesday, June 19th, 2012 - Carol Graham

The protracted shoulder is a very common postural imbalance that is seen in a high percentage of the general population. The people that are most at risk include those who have a sedentary lifestyle, those who do a lot of pressing exercises (bench press), and also athletes who overuse certain muscles (baseball players, swimmers, etc…).

The best way to visually see if you or somebody else has this postural deviation is by checking out how you are standing, and the way your shoulders, back and arms are positioned. If you have a protracted shoulder girdle, your shoulders will be rounded forward, your upper/mid back might be hunched/rounded, and your arms will be internally rotated (palms facing back).

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Saturday, July 9th, 2011 - Shane Doll

Ben Grewe- certified Charleston personal trainer. Most of us admire some sort of professional athlete for their incredible abilities that, to us, seem nothing short of God-given.

These athletes come from a myriad of different sports: soccer, football, baseball, gymnastics, ice skating, hockey, etc. One group of athletes that I have always admired are gymnasts. Not only are their solid frames packed with muscle, but they are unbelievably flexible.

Flexibility is a feature that is often left out of most traditional fitness routines. However, any athlete, especially a gymnast, will tell you that much of their talent is probably God-given, but none of them reached their supreme physical form without beginning somewhere. That somewhere almost definitely involved some sort of flexibility training.

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Thursday, February 24th, 2011 - Shane Doll

Mike Sigmon, CPT, one of our certified Charleston personal trainers here at Shaping Concepts has created a series of stretching and flexibility videos for a new program he’s working on called Project Shape.

In today’s post I’ve included the videos that include some great examples of how to use tools like the foam roller, a rolling pin, medicine ball, golf ball, and tennis ball. Some really cool stuff if you’ve never used these things before.

If you want to improve your flexibility or just ease those aches and pains these techniques will work wonders for you. Mike is a very sharp fitness professional and knows his stuff.  I encourage to check out his videos and incorporate some of the stretches into your exercise routines for optimal performance and decreased risks of injury.

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Thursday, September 9th, 2010 - Staff

It has been shown that between 60-85% of the American population will experience some incidence of lower back pain in their lifetime. Such a high prevalence of back pain not only causes discomfort but also a loss of productivity at work. Not to mention how it can affect overall health.

The largest causes of back pain are from sitting too much, lifting with improper form, and trying to lift weights that are too heavy. Fortunately, there is something that can be done to counteract the prevalence of injury and to rehab once there is a low back injury.

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Thursday, September 9th, 2010 - Shane Doll

From the desk of Shane Doll, CPT, CSCS
Founder- Shaping Concepts Personal Training Studios
Charleston, SC

Hi, this is Shane Doll. Thanks for coming to check out my page on knee rehabilitation exercises.

If you’re going through knee rehab right now with a physical therapist, just finishing up rehab, or getting ready to schedule corrective surgery, I think you’ll find this page to be very helpful and informative.

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Thursday, September 9th, 2010 - Shane Doll

If you participate in any sport that involves some form of jumping, cutting or changing directions quickly you run the risk of an ACL injury. The purpose of this article is to help shed some insight on why ACL injuries occur and how to prevent one.

If you’re a female athlete pay special attention as you’re four to five times more likely to experience a non-contact ACL injury than a male athlete. There are numerous reasons for this but a primary difference in males and females is the width of their pelvis.

The wider pelvis in females creates a greater “Q angle” or the angle at which the femur (upper leg bone) meets the tibia (lower leg bone). The increased angle places more stress on the knee joint during landing or changing directions.

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Wednesday, September 8th, 2010 - Shane Doll

What should you do if you’re the unlucky recipient of a groin pull? And even more importantly how can you prevent a groin pull from happening altogether.

A “groin pull” (aka groin strain) is often a bruise, stretching, or tearing of the muscle fibers that run from the front of the hip bone to the inside of the thigh.

These “hip-adductor” muscles move the thigh toward the center line of the body (adduction) and also help to control and limit movements of the thigh away from the body’s center line.

Thus, the adductor muscles stabilize the hip and leg during any activity which involves running. In some groin pulls, the muscles themselves are okay, but the tendons attaching the muscles to the front of the hip bone are stretched and inflamed.

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Wednesday, September 8th, 2010 - Staff

Do you suffer from low back pain that just won’t seem to go away? Are you sick and tired of having to miss out on your favorite activities because you are afraid of how you’ll feel the next day? It isn’t enough to live life half way!

According to the American Chiropractic Association, thirty-one million Americans have low back pain at any given time. One half of all working Americans admit to having back symptoms each year. One of the main reasons that so many people are susceptible to low back strains is due to our sedentary lifestyles (sitting too much).

The low back is comprised of five lumbar vertebrae which are connected with ligaments and surrounded by several muscles, tendons, nerves, and intervetebral disks.

When someone develops back pain, or an injury occurs, one or more of these structures will often be affected. The surrounding muscles are what you’ll most likely find injured during a strain.

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